Gardening Zone by ZIP Code

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USDA Zone Finder


  • What is a USDA zone? A USDA zone is a climate classification system that divides the United States into 13 zones based on average annual minimum temperatures. Knowing your USDA zone can help you choose plants that are best suited for your climate.
  • How does the zone app work? The zone app is a simple and easy-to-use tool that allows users to enter their zip code and find out their USDA zone. The app is also mobile-friendly, so you can use it on your smartphone or tablet.
  • Why is it important to know your USDA zone? Knowing your USDA zone is important for a number of reasons. It can help you choose plants that are best suited for your climate, avoid planting plants that are not cold-hardy enough for your area, and plan your garden accordingly.
  • How can I use the zone app to improve my garden? The zone app can help you improve your garden in a number of ways. You can use it to choose plants that are best suited for your climate, avoid planting plants that are not cold-hardy enough for your area, and plan your garden accordingly.

What Is My USDA Zone?

I created seededgarden.com to help my fellow gardeners select plants, flowers, and vegetables that will grow well and easily in their local climate zones. I believe that gardening should be a joy rather than a chore, and I want to make it easier for everyone to find the right plants for their gardens. I’m sure my website will help gardeners all over the world cultivate beautiful and bountiful gardens.

By USDA-ARS and Oregon State University (OSU) – http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/Downloads.aspx, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18665128

Important Facts about USDA Zones:

Zone 1 is characterized by extremely cold winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -60°F (-51°C) to -50°F (-46°C). Major population centers in this zone are Barrow, Alaska and Prudhoe Bay, Alaska.

Arctic Lupine
  • An herbaceous plant that thrives in Zone 1 is Arctic Lupine (Lupinus arcticus): This perennial herbaceous plant is adapted to cold climates and can withstand the extreme temperatures of Zone 1. It produces vibrant blue or purple flowers.

Zone 2 experiences very cold winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -50°F (-46°C) to -40°F (-40°C). Major population centers in this zone are Fairbanks, Alaska and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Siberian iris
  • An herbaceous plant that thrives in Zone 2 is Siberian Iris (Iris sibirica): Siberian Iris is a hardy perennial that thrives in Zone 2. It produces beautiful flowers in various colors, including shades of blue, purple, and white, adding color to the landscape.

Zone 3 features cold winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -40°F (-40°C) to -30°F (-34°C). Major population centers in this zone are Duluth, Minnesota and Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

  • Zone 3 includes areas that aren’t as cold as Zones 1 and 2, so your herbaceous plant choices really increase. I’d recommend Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta): Black-Eyed Susan is a hardy perennial that can tolerate the cold winters of Zone 3. It produces cheerful yellow flowers with dark centers, adding color to the garden.

Zone 4 has cool to cold winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -30°F (-34°C) to -20°F (-29°C). Major population centers in this zone are Chicago, Illinois and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Zone 5 experiences cool winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -20°F (-29°C) to -10°F (-23°C). Major population centers in this zone are Des Moines, Iowa and Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Zone 6 has mild to cool winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from -10°F (-23°C) to 0°F (-18°C). Major population centers in this zone are St. Louis, Missouri and Columbus, Ohio.

Zone 7 features mild winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 0°F (-18°C) to 10°F (-12°C). Major population centers in this zone are Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Washington, D.C.

Zone 8 experiences mild to warm winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 10°F (-12°C) to 20°F (-7°C). Major population centers in this zone are Dallas, Texas and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Zone 9 has warm winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 20°F (-7°C) to 30°F (-1°C). Major population centers in this zone are Phoenix, Arizona and Miami, Florida.

Zone 10 features very warm winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 30°F (-1°C) to 40°F (4°C). Major population centers in this zone are Honolulu, Hawaii and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Zone 11 experiences tropical to subtropical winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 40°F (4°C) to 50°F (10°C). Major population centers in this zone are Miami, Florida and Hilo, Hawaii.

  • Herbaceous plant that thrives in Zone 11 is Ginger Lily (Hedychium spp.): Ginger Lilies are herbaceous perennials that produce large, fragrant flowers in shades of white, yellow, orange, and red. They thrive in the warm and humid conditions of Zone 11.
Ginger Lily bloom

Zone 12 has tropical winters, with average annual minimum temperatures ranging from 50°F (10°C) to 60°F (16°C). Major population centers in this zone are Ponce, Puerto Rico and Kahului, Hawaii.

  • If you live in Zone 12, I’m very jealous because you can grow Bird of Paradise. Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae): Known for its striking orange and blue flowers that resemble a tropical bird, Bird of Paradise is a popular herbaceous perennial in Zone 12 gardens. It enjoys full sun and well-drained soil.
Bird of Paradise

Zone 13 features tropical to equatorial winters, with average annual minimum temperatures above 60°F (16°C). Major population centers in this zone are Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands and Lihue, Hawaii.

USDA Zone Classification Factors

USDA zones primarily rely on average annual minimum temperatures as the key factor for determining each zone’s classification.

Note, though, that additional factors that can influence the characteristics of each zone:

  1. Frost Dates: The occurrence of frost dates, including the last spring frost and first fall frost, can vary across different USDA zones. These dates play a crucial role in determining the length of the growing season. While there is a median date, this last Frost Date can vary from year to year. Zone 8 areas can see hail and snow flurries in early April. If you are going to plant seedlings or saplings, new growth is much more sensitive to temperature variances than established plants. If in doubt, keep seedlings and saplings inside.
  2. Snowfall: Snowfall patterns and accumulation can significantly impact gardening and plant survival in colder USDA zones. Zones with heavier snowfall may have longer-lasting snow cover, affecting the availability of sunlight and moisture for plants.
  3. Precipitation: The amount and distribution of precipitation, including rainfall and snowfall, can influence soil moisture levels and overall plant growth. Some USDA zones may experience drier or wetter conditions, affecting the types of plants that thrive in those areas.
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Author

After years of denying it, Donald finally admits one passion in life is gardening. More specifically: growing seeds, plants, flowers and edibles and helping them to be the best possible. Neighbors call him a Green Thumb. He lives in Western Washington with his wife of 24+ years and three cats.

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